March 2019 Newsletter

NEWS ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

WHO consolidated guidelines on drug-resistant tuberculosis treatment
These Consolidated guidelines include a comprehensive set of WHO recommendations for the treatment and care of DR-TB, derived from these WHO guidelines documents. The consolidated guidelines include policy recommendations on treatment regimens for isoniazid-resistant TB (Hr-TB) and MDR/RR-TB, including longer and shorter regimens, culture monitoring of patients on treatment, the timing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in MDR/RR-TB patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), use of surgery for patients receiving MDR-TB treatment, and optimal models of patient support and care.
Access the full guidelines and WHO report here.
Download the guidelines directly here.

Upcoming RESIST-TB Webinar
On Friday, April 12th from 08:30 to 9:30 EST (14:30-15:30 CEST and SAST), RESIST-TB will be hosting a webinar on two presentations from the 2019 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI):
THE INHindsight Trial
(Early bactericidal activity of high-dose isonizaid against multidrug-resistant TB)
by Kelly E. DooleyThe DELIBERATE Trial
(QT effects of bedaquiline, delamanid or both in MDR-TB patients)
by Gary Maartens*An announcement will sent out soon with details on how to join the webinar.

PUBLICATIONS

1. Treatment outcomes of patients switching from an injectable drug to bedaquiline during short standardized MDR-TB treatment in Mozambique
Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 11. pii: ciz196. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz196.
Bastard M, Molfino L, Mutaquiha C, Galindo MA, Zindoga P, Vaz D, Mahinça I, du Cros P, Rusch B, Telnov A

ABSTRACT: Bedaquiline was recommended by WHO as the preferred option in treatment of MDR-TB patients with long regimen. However, no recommendation was given for the short MDR-TB regimen. Data from our small cohort of patients who switched injectable dug to bedaquiline suggest that bedaquiline based short regimen is effective and safe.

This article is unavailable via open access.

2. A Trial of a Shorter Regimen for Rifampin-Resistant Tuberculosis.
N Engl J Med. 2019 Mar 13. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1811867.
Nunn AJ, Phillips PPJ, Meredith SK, et. al.

BACKGROUND: Cohort studies in Bangladesh showed promising cure rates among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis who received existing drugs in regimens shorter than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2011.
METHODS: We conducted a phase 3 noninferiority trial in participants with rifampin-resistant tuberculosis that was susceptible to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Participants were randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive
a short regimen (9 to 11 months) that included high-dose moxifloxacin or a long regimen (20 months) that followed the 2011 WHO guidelines. The primary efficacy outcome was a favorable status at 132 weeks, defined by cultures negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis at 132 weeks and at a previous occasion, with no intervening positive culture or previous unfavorable outcome. An upper 95% confidence limit for the between-group difference in favorable status that was 10 percentage points or less was used to determine noninferiority.
RESULTS: Of 424 participants who underwent randomization, 383 were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. Favorable status was reported in 79.8% of participants in the long-regimen group and in 78.8% of those in the short-regimen group – a difference, with adjustment for human immunodeficiency virus status, of 1.0 percentage point (95% confidence interval [CI], -7.5 to 9.5) (P = 0.02 for noninferiority). The results with respect to noninferiority were consistent among the 321 participants in the per-protocol population (adjusted difference, -0.7 percentage points; 95% CI, -10.5 to 9.1). An adverse event of grade 3 or higher occurred in 45.4% of participants in the long-regimen group and in 48.2% in the short-regimen group. Prolongation of either the QT interval or the corrected QT interval (calculated with Fridericia’s formula) to 500 msec occurred in 11.0% of participants in the short-regimen group, as compared with 6.4% in the long-regimen group (P = 0.14); because of the greater incidence in the short-regimen group, participants were closely monitored and some received medication adjustments. Death occurred in 8.5% of participants in the short-regimen group and in 6.4% in the long-regimen group, and acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides occurred in 3.3% and 2.3%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: In persons with rifampin-resistant tuberculosis that was susceptible to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides, a short regimen was noninferior to a long regimen with respect to the primary efficacy outcome and was similar to the long regimen in terms of safety.

Read the full article here.

3. Cycloserine Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Patients with
Tuberculosis.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019 Mar 11. pii: AAC.00055-19. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00055-19.
Alghamdi WA, Alsultan A, Al-Shaer MH, An G, Ahmed S, Alkabab Y, Banu S, Barbakadze K, Houpt E, Kipiani M, Mikiashvili L, Schmidt S, Heysell SK, Kempker RR, Cegielski JP, Peloquin CA.

BACKGROUND: Limited pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data exist on
cycloserine in tuberculosis (TB) patients. We pooled several studies into a large
PK dataset to estimate the population PK parameters for cycloserine in TB
patients. We also performed simulations to provide insight into optimizing the
dosing of cycloserine.
METHODS: TB patients were included from Georgia, Bangladesh, and four U.S. sites. Monolix and mlxR package were used for population PK modeling and simulation. We used PK/PD targets for time above MIC ≥30% and ≥64%, representing bactericidal activity and 80% of the maximum kill, to calculate the probability of target attainment (PTA). Optimal PK/PD breakpoints were defined as the highest MIC to achieve ≥90% of PTA.
RESULTS: Data from 247 subjects, including 205 patients with drug-resistant TB, were included. The data were best described by a one-compartment model. In most cases, the PK/PD breakpoints for the simulated regimens were similar for both PK/PD targets. Higher PTA was achieved as the total daily dose was increased. The
highest PK/PD breakpoint that resulted from the use of 250 mg dosages was 16 mg/L. For MICs >16 mg/L, doses of at least 500 mg three times daily or 750 mg twice daily were needed.
CONCLUSIONS: The current dosing for cycloserine, 250 to 500 mg once or twice daily, is not sufficient for MICs >16mg/L. Further studies are needed regarding the efficacy and tolerability of daily doses >1000 mg. Dividing the dose minimally affected the PK/PD breakpoints while optimized exposure, which can potentially reduce the drug adverse effects.

Read the full article here.

4. Antiretroviral switching and bedaquiline treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis HIV co-infection.
Lancet HIV. 2019 Mar;6(3):e201-e204. doi: 10.1016/S2352-3018(19)30035-9.
O’Donnell MR, Padayatchi N, Daftary A, Orrell C, Dooley KE, Rivet Amico K, Friedland G.

ABSTRACT: Bedaquiline, a potent new therapy for drug-resistant tuberculosis, results in improved survival including in HIV patients with multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. In line with WHO recommendations, in South Africa
and other low-income and middle-income settings, antiretroviral therapy is switched from generic fixed-dose combination efavirenz-containing regimens to twice-daily nevirapine with separate companion pills because of interactions between efavirenz and bedaquiline. Early data suggest a signal for low antiretroviral therapy adherence after this antiretroviral therapy switch. Mortality and other tuberculosis-specific benefits noted with bedaquiline treatment in multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis HIV might be compromised by HIV viral failure, and emergent antiretroviral resistance. Programmatic responses, such as adherence support and dual pharmacovigilance, should be instituted; antiretroviral therapy initiation with fixed-dose combinations without bedaquiline drug interactions should be strongly considered.

Read the full article here (will require a free Lancet account).

 

5. Health care gaps in the global burden of drug-resistant tuberculosis.                                                                                                  Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2019 Feb 1;23(2):125-135. doi: 10.5588/ijtld.18.0866.                                                                                                               Cox V, Cox H, Pai M, Stillo J, Citro B, Brigden G.

ABSTRACT: The drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) cascade-from estimated or incident cases to numbers successfully treated or disease-free survival-has long been characterised by sharp declines at each step in the cascade. The losses along the cascade vary across different settings, and the reasons why some countries have a higher burden of DR-TB are complex and multifactorial; broadly, weak health systems, inadequate financing and poverty all impact differential access to DR-TB care. Within a human rights framework that mandates the right to health and the right to benefit from scientific progress, the aim of this review is to focus on describing inequities in access to DR-TB care at critical points in the cascade.